La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
La Oroya La Oroya
  • La Oroya
    Workers from the Doe Run plant proudly display a photograph from more prosperous times.
    La Oroya

    The Doe Run smelter stack in the the Mantaro River valley.

    La Oroya
    Domingo Rosales sells refreshments on the bridge where workes at the Doe Run plant in La Oroya pass each day. Rosales says that when the plant was running full capacity his sales would reach 40 neuvo sol per day but now he is lucky to sell 20.
    La Oroya
    The Doe Run Smelter complex is seen across the river from Old La Oroya.
    La Oroya
    Mother and Daughter doing laundry along the Mantaro river north of the smelter where the fumes from the smelter never drift. They earn extra income from washing laundry for anyone willing to pay six nueva sols per 12 pieces of clothing.
    La Oroya
    Mother and Child.
    La Oroya
    Wearing black for one year is still the mourning tradition for this shepherdess, having lost her husband. Chewing the traditional cocoa leaves while herding her 80 goats to pasture land helps with the altitude and hunger.
    La Oroya
    “Huelga” or Strike proclaims the red sign at the front of the union hall during a membership meeting of the unions employed by the Doe Run Company. Before the meeting Secratarie General, Roiberto Guzman Estrada explained that the timing was not right for a strike as the facility is not running at full capacity because of Doe Run’s financial difficulties with mineral suppliers. The union is fighting for a benefit package including revenue sharing increase.
    La Oroya
    Members of the Ramon Castilla high school band perform Himno de La Oroya during the assembly for Feliz Dia Madre.
    La Oroya
    Workers in La Oroya.
    La Oroya
    Football in the schoolyard.
    La Oroya
    Students rush out of school after a Friday afternoon assembly.